Novel datasets lead to high impact publications. Read about some of the outcomes from using our technology below!

DNA nanomapping using CRISPR-Cas9 as a programmable nanoparticle – Nature Communications

In this work, led by Andrey Mikheikin, a high-speed atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to map long strands of DNA labelled with CRISPR-Cas9, realizing the new potential of high-speed AFM as a diagnostic tool.

Read more about this research in Nature Communications!

– Mikheikin, A., Olsen, A., Leslie, K., Russell-Pavier, F., Yacoot, A., Picco, L., Payton, O., Toor, A., Chesney, A., Gimzewski, J.K. and Mishra, B., 2017. DNA nanomapping using CRISPR-Cas9 as a programmable nanoparticle. Nature communications, 8(1), pp.1-9.

High-speed atomic force microscopy for materials science – International Materials Reviews

In this review, Oliver Payton et al. describe the capabilities, the benefits, and the range of experiments possible within materials science using the high-speed atomic force microscope (AFM). This paper acts as an excellent resource for any materials scientist scoping out the potential of the high-speed AFM, from corrosion to lithography.

Read more about this research in International Materials Reviews!

– Payton, O.D., Picco, L. and Scott, T.B., 2016. High-speed atomic force microscopy for materials science. International Materials Reviews, 61(8), pp.473-494.

Observation of stress corrosion cracking using real-time in situ high-speed atomic force microscopy and correlative techniques – Nature Materials Degradation

In this work, led by Stacy Moore at the University of Bristol, a high-speed atomic force microscope (AFM) is used alongside other correlative methods for the study of stress corrosion cracking. The high-speed AFM allowed for in-situ experiments resulting in novel insights into the cracking process.

Read more about this research in Nature Materials Degradation!

– Moore, S., Burrows, R., Kumar, D., Kloucek, M.B., Warren, A.D., Flewitt, P.E.J., Picco, L., Payton, O.D. and Martin, T.L., 2021. Observation of stress corrosion cracking using real-time in situ high-speed atomic force microscopy and correlative techniques. npj Materials Degradation, 5(1), pp.1-10.

But that’s not all!

You can find a complete list of publications by clicking the button below.

(It’s long, you’ve been warned!)