The BND Scanner is capable of real-time video imaging of dynamic processes in air, liquid, or controlled humidity/gaseous environments for in-situ observation and measurement of dynamic biological, chemical, and physical nanoscale processes such as: corrosion, electrodeposition, viral infection etc.

The Fastest AFM in the World

Conventional AFM

BND Nano Dynamic Scanner

The video shows a comparison between a conventional atomic force microscope (AFM) on the left, and our BND Nano Dynamic Scanner on the right, collecting data from a stainless steel sample with a frame size of 4 micrometres (at the video start).

 

Our BND Scanners are capable of collecting multiple frames every second making them significantly faster than our leading competitors. The increased imaging speed combined with the ability to move around the surface using an intuitive 3D joystick makes navigating the nanoscale easy.

CASE STUDY I: OBSERVATION OF SALT GROWTH

The video on the left shows magnesium chloride (MgCl2) salt growth. The salt crystals appear to stand proud of the surface and increase in size over time. By observing the evolution of these features, factors such as rate of growth or time to nucleation can be determined.

This research was performed at the University of Bristol and is reported in [1].

CASE STUDY II: IN-SITU CORROSION MEASUREMENTS

The video on the right shows the dissolution of grain boundary carbide precipitates in a sensitised stainless steel in a solution of sodium thiosulfate. This process is particularly relevant within the nuclear sector as it can act as a precursor to stress corrosion cracking.

This research was performed at the University of Bristol and is reported in [2].

REFERENCES:

[1] Payton, O.D., Picco, L. and Scott, T.B., 2016. High-speed atomic force microscopy for materials science. International Materials Reviews, 61(8), pp.473-494.

[2] Moore, S., Burrows, R., Kumar, D., Kloucek, M.B., Warren, A.D., Flewitt, P.E.J., Picco, L., Payton, O.D. and Martin, T.L., 2021. Observation of stress corrosion cracking using real-time in situ high-speed atomic force microscopy and correlative techniques. npj Materials Degradation, 5(1), pp.1-10.

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